The Burchiello in art

Patronized and used for centuries by important persons, poets, painters, and musicians who mentioned, commented, described and portrayed it in their works, the Burchiello became the symbol of the epic of the civilizations of the Villas, represented in countless works of art.

Adriano Banchieri, an Italian composer and poet of the late Renaissance, a musician organist and composer, dedicated to the Burchiello his madrigal comedy “La Barca di Venetia per Padova” (the Boat of Venice to Padua), a funny and cheerful tale of a trip on the Burchiello in 1605, from Venice to Padua, and of the various characters on board and their stories. You can see and listen to this work at the link
http://www.ilburchiello.it/it/primopiano/la-barca-di-venetia-per-padova-001

Giovanni Sagredo published “L’Arcadia in Brenta” (under the pseudonym Ginnesio Gavardo Vacalerio) in 1667, a collection of short stories of the late seventeenth century set on the Burchiello and the Brenta Riviera.

Even Carlo Goldoni, a regular passenger on the Burchiello, published his “Arcadia in Brenta” in the mid-Eighteenth century, and dedicated two poems to the Burchiello: “Burchiello” in 1756 in Venetian dialect, and “Il Burchiello di Padova” in Italian in 1760.

The Burchiello is represented in almost all the engravings by Vincenzo Maria Coronelli in his work “La Brenta, quasi borgo della città di Venezia, luogo di delizie de’ veneti patrizi, delineata e descritta” (The Brenta, almost a village of the city of Venice, a place of delight for the Venetian patricians, delineated and described) in 1709.

The Burchiello is also present in the engravings of the work “Continuation der Nürbergischen Hesperidum” published in Nuremberg in 1713 by Johann Christoph Volkamer, and in “Delle delicie del fiume Brenta” (About the delights of the Brenta River) published in 1750 by the Venetian architect and painter Gianfrancesco Costa.

Paintings about the Burchiello are to be found in the works of Giovanni Antonio Canal, known as Canaletto and his nephew Bernardo Bellotto, of Giovanni Battista Cimaroli and his pupils, of Francesco Guardi and his son Giacomo, of Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, and many others…